All the Old Books are New Again

…at least, they are for me right now, as I’m having the intensely pleasurable experience of introducing my son to the great science fiction that I grew up with, and recommending good current fiction as well.

My Aspergian son reads well but slowly, so he’s not able to get through the sheer number of books I did at his age (plus, I never had to deal with the siren song of the digital world.) He often listens to recorded books (thank you, Audible subscription) but I still have to make recommendations knowing that he won’t read as many books.

So, where do you start? Start in the Golden Age and work your way up? Start now and go back?

I also homeschool him for his core classes, including English and Social Studies, so a few novels made their way in under the guise of assigned reading. Last year, he read Little Brother by Cory Doctorow at the same time we were following the Edward Snowden situation, so that was a huge success (my son is feverishly reading Homeland right now.) We also started listening to 1984 on a car ride recently, and maybe it was the narrator, but we were both super creeped out by descriptions of the Ministries in the beginning, especially the Ministry of Love–I’d forgotten how great George Orwell’s prose is.

This past school year, my son read Starship Troopers and then All Quiet on the Western Front, which, along with The Iliad, made for an entire year-long examination of war in literature. He has a dystopian literature class coming up, so he’ll read Fahrenheit 451 and Ready Player One. (The class also covers World War Z, which he’s read and loves–of course…)

So my son’s getting quite a dose of dystopian fiction–I’ll need to bring in a broader view of science fiction and fantasy. For sure more Heinlein, some Asimov and Clarke. Plus John Scalzi, Neal Stephenson, Iain Banks, Stephen King…LOTR! Narnia!!!

So many great books, so little time…luckily, he likes to get recommendations from me (so far), and even more luckily, I feel the need to revisit these novels to make sure my recommendations hold up over time…

Any ideas? If you could read only ten books EVER again, what would they be? Or, if you were designing a high school curriculum around science fiction, how would that look?

This was the cover of my copy of Starship Troopers, from when I first read it in the late seventies or very early eighties. I had to get a new copy for my son because this one sadly fell apart when I tried to read it.

This was the cover of my copy of Starship Troopers, from when I first read it in the late seventies or very early eighties. I had to get a new copy for my son because this one sadly fell apart when I tried to read it.

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I learn by teaching, think by writing — My New Latin Motto

 

Roman ruins of Caesarea Maritima in Israel

The Romans, gotta love-’em (photo taken at Caesarea Maritima in Israel)

Docendo disco, scribendo cogito: I learn by teaching, think by writing.

How exactly did the Romans come up with such crazily relevant stuff? As in, the phrase above that perfectly describes my life at this moment: teaching high school to my twice-exceptional son and writing writing writing.

Disclaimer:

As TVTropes (BTW, this is an extremely awesome website for writers plus all the cool kids) says: “Well, nothing can dictate pretentious credibility compared to a Latin motto. It’s supposed to confer prestige, but Latin often gives off that “we’re so much smarter, richer and generally more awesome than you” vibe…”

Okay, maybe. But I do just really like Latin. I’m one of the seven people in the world who wishes Latin had even been an option in high school, as compared to the countless millions who were forced to take it and hated every moment of it.

I’m looking for another Latin quote to describe my life with even greater accuracy–something along the lines of : “runs family business/has too many pets/drives kids around a lot/does not cook or clean house except under duress/recently allowed 12 year-old-son to put various household objects in microwave to see what would happen…”